Author Archives: Mark Bailey

About Mark Bailey

I am the founder and board member of Torrey House Press, a book publisher promoting conservation through literature and proprietor of the Torrey House - Alpenglow Observatory. I am also a director at Western Watersheds Project and Wild Utah Project.

Republicans are Going After Democracy's Jugular

Trump wants to be the last American president. U.S Attorney General William Barr is paving the way. Republican legislators are all in. For Republicans it is all about power, democracy be damned.

Trump, however, is so unpopular the only way he can win is if Sanders is the Democratic candidate. Sanders is a spoiler, it’s all he has ever been. It is not the time to quibble but to put forward the Democratic candidate most likely to win. If we don’t win now we won’t have a democracy to fight over and improve. The issue is not a progressive agenda but democracy itself. And, thanks to Trump, the opposition to democracy will be fierce.

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Michael Bloomberg with Sierra Club’s Carl Pope

Bloomberg is by far the most organized, capable, uber-financed candidate who can and would win. He will fight fire with fire, gloves off all the way. He is our best hope. As bespeaks his character, if Bloomberg does not win the Democratic Party nomination, he will still use his vast wealth to fight Trump anyway. I like that he is a proven conservationist, but at this point that is only icing on the cake.

And imagine this: a Michael Bloomberg / Stacey Abrams ticket.

I will be searching for how best for we conservation peons to support Michael Bloomberg.

Assets or Asses?

I used to downhill ski frequently. Not like a season pass holder, but 20 times a season or so. I’m in my 60’s now and have not skied for a year. But some of my long time ski buddies came to town, guys I first started skiing with in college, and I told them I would join them on the mountain today. They suggested we meet in the parking lot at Park City resort’s plaza at 7:15 AM and find a place for breakfast. They also needed to rent skis. When I asked why so early they said they were concerned about traffic. I thought, well, they are from California and don’t realize it is not as crowded here in Utah. I suggested I would meet them in the ticket line at 8:45, 15 minutes before the lifts open. Plans made.

Oops.

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Greatest story missed the best part.

The Greatest Story Ever Told--So Far: Why Are We Here?The Greatest Story Ever Told–So Far: Why Are We Here? by Lawrence M. Krauss

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Krauss goes largely into nuclear and particle physics where many of my quantum physics books don’t. He does great history research on the physicists with perspective on how their discoveries and conclusions came about. Krauss simplifies for the lay reader about as much as possible, but it is not simple. There are enough effects named after an alphabet soup of physicists to keep the reader cross-eyed. Another emphasis is quantum physics after 1950 which is more complicated, less inspiring, and often overlooked.

I am interested in consciousness and its undeniable roll in the quantum. Krauss has a scold about ignoring evidence and letting arrogance and belief get in the way of open minded, honest exploration. Then he arrogantly dismisses consciousness exploration as woo best left to the unserious like Deprak Chopra. So, in fact, he completely glosses over the greatest story. Perhaps he is right about, “So Far.” The best is yet to come.

See all of my book reviews here.

Defying Trump II

I remember pondering in my excellent high school civics class whether something like Nazism could happen here. The common wisdom and a pervading sense of pride and patriotism was that it could not. But the Germans I knew all seemed like good people. And smart. I look back those forty plus years and give myself credit. With trepidation I thought, sure, it could probably happen here, too.

Sadly, here we are, our constitutional democracy is crumbling under a relentless assault. Republicans today are failing in a similar manner to how decent Germans failed in the 1930’s.

I wrote on these pages after the 2016 election of my three legged plan to defy Trump.  I set out to:

  1. Publish books with progressive ideas promoting love of the land
  2. Promote and support women in leadership
  3. Build a blue oasis in a red, red state

I am doing pretty well on all three. Torrey House Press is having a record year and is building a terrific staff to keep expanding its impact. I plan on raising a cool $1 million to help them further build capacity. The board, besides me, is all women and so is the staff. And to a small but hopefully useful extent I levered my observatory to help the town of Torrey, Utah become an International Dark Association certified dark sky community.

I want to do more.

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Proof I’m not living right

Utah is having a long, dry, and warm fall. The region is under a massive atmospheric high pressure which is typical in the Intermountain West in the fall but this one is lasting longer than usual. The big high pressure is the same that makes for down slope winds out of the Sierra Nevada mountains and fans California’s big fires. If those guys would only rake their forests.

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Penance

It has been warm but I knew there was a reason I was procrastinating turning off the sprinklers. Two or three years ago I had to replace the sprinkler system’s stop and waste valve. It is four feet or so underground and is a miserable job. I was a little worried about dirt getting into the access tube. Sure enough, when I finally got to the chore this past Monday there seemed to be too much dirt in the tube and the valve wouldn’t turn. I tried to think of ways to get dirt out of the bottom of a four foot tube but was coming up short. I finally decided I would have to dig and try to clear things out.  Just as narrow a hole as possible.

As I dug I realized my watch had fallen off. Continue reading

Cut it all down and plow it all under?

Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great WestNature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West by William Cronon

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

If I was more into the Midwest I might have given this title yet another star. Even so, the perspective of the mid to late 19th century conversion of the Midwest from natural landscape to a completely extracted farm was enlightening. Excruciating, but enlightening. The prairies were plowed under on farms made possible by converting the great northern forests to lumber. Chicago markets and finance made it all possible.

The voraciousness of markets and the shortsighted lure of immediate profits spell doom and destruction for natural and wild landscapes. The 19th century mindset held no conception that the natural world was a limited resource. And one that is necessary to the maintenance of life.

How does the culture get changed to become aware and develop some reverence for the natural world? Books like this help.

View all my reviews